bulletins (complete list)

  • The zero draft of the Pact for the Future was released on January 26, 2024. Rev. 1 of the Pact of the Future was released on May 14, 2024, after consultations with member states. This bulletin will focus on Chapter 4, comparing the zero draft and Rev. 1. identifying the key terms or statements that were removed, modified, maintained, or added. 
  • The Zero Draft of the Declaration on Future Generations aims to ensure a better future for generations to come by promoting peace, human rights, poverty eradication, and global cooperation. Member States provided feedback on the draft, calling for an action-oriented and ambitious approach, clarity, inclusivity, and considerations for data and cultural aspects. They also highlighted the importance of economic language, gender equality, intergenerational solidarity, and the role of the UN Charter and international law. Key priorities include promoting international peace and security, respecting human rights, guaranteeing future generations’ rights to flourish, preserving a sustainable environment, and strengthening the multilateral system for collaboration and trust-building.
  • During the first week of April 2024, Member States engaged in the second reading of the zero draft of the Pact for the Future at the United Nations Headquarters in New York. The discussions highlighted the importance of youth and future generations in crafting a sustainable future. Member States emphasized investing in inclusive education, eliminating prejudice, and improving digital literacy to empower young people. They also stressed the need for cultural engagement and active involvement in decision-making processes to foster a more inclusive society. Member States also highlighted the importance of empowering Indigenous women and youth and ensuring their full participation in decision-making processes. Concerns were raised regarding Indigenous women, children, and youth; these concerns included access to health services, education, and preserving traditional knowledge. Member States called for the removal of barriers preventing young people from running for public leadership positions and urged nations to guarantee their representation in political systems. They also emphasized the need for flexible funding for youth organizations and the establishment of national youth consultative bodies to engage in policy making. Overall, the discussions emphasized the importance of prioritizing youth development and intergenerational collaboration to address global challenges and ensure a sustainable future.
  • Following informal consultations in December 2023 and First and Second Readings through February and March 2024, the co-facilitators of the Summit of the Future (SOTF) released a 46-page compilation text for Chapter 5 on Transforming Global Governance. This chapter deals with a range of issues from the reform of the Security Council to increasing the regular resources for the Office of UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, the reform of the International Financial Institutions (IFIs) and Peaceful Uses of Outer Space.
  • Member States have expressed their expectations for transformation of the global governance institutions in this Chapter. The reform of IFIs and global economic governance mechanisms took a large portion of the compilation text, where the G-77 proposed language for a greater and proportionate representation in decision-making bodies and made several proposals for financing of the SDGs, many of which were not fully supported by Western countries. Get yourself updated on the headlines and details of the negotiations on Chapter 5 in the following ICH bulletin.
  • Following informal consultations in December 2023 and First and Second Readings through February and March 2024, the co-facilitators of the Summit of the Future (SOTF) released a 21-page compilation text for Chapter 3 on Science, Technology and Innovation and Digital Cooperation. This chapter deals with several important issues from harnessing science and technology through a human rights-based approach to tackle global challenges and achieve the SDGs. It emphasizes the peaceful use of nuclear technology, partnerships, and technology transfer, and balanced geographical representation in scientific advisory boards.
  • Key issues include responsible business practices, adaptable intellectual property rights, managing technological risks, promoting digital inclusion, enhancing South-South cooperation, evidence-based policymaking, and strengthening global support for STEM education and human rights in digital cooperation. Additionally, member states urge addressing specific challenges like gender-based violence and healthcare accessibility. Stay informed on the latest developments and detailed insights from compilation text for Chapter 3 in the following comprehensive ICH bulletin.
  • Following informal consultations in December 2023 and First and Second Readings through February and March 2024, the co-facilitators of the Summit of the Future (SOTF) released a 78-page compilation text for Chapter 2 on International Peace and Security. This chapter deals with a range of issues from peacekeeping, peacebuilding fund and nuclear disarmament to outer space, Lethal Autonomous Weapons (LAWs), and coordination with Regional Organizations.
  • Member States have attempted to tackle some of the contemporary issues related to international peace and security, such as exploring a legally binding instrument for LAWs; reviving disarmament processes such as the Conference on Disarmament; setting roadmaps and targets for illicit trade of small arms, among others. Get yourself updated on the headlines and details of the compilation text for Chapter 2 in the following ICH bulletin.
  • Between February 6 and February 9, 2024, Member States gathered at the United Nations Headquarters in New York for the first reading of the zero draft of the Pact for the Future. During the discussions, it was emphasized that youth play a critical role in shaping a sustainable future by championing gender equality and fostering a more inclusive global workplace. The well-being of future generations is intricately linked to their education and empowerment, with Member States recognizing the significance of investing in inclusive education for their long-term development. Furthermore, Member States highlighted the importance of addressing issues such as discrimination, promoting intercultural dialogue, and enhancing digital literacy to support the growth and well-being of young people. Cultural engagement and active participation in decision-making processes were also underscored as essential components for building a more inclusive society. In addition, some Member States extended an invitation to the Secretary-General to take the lead in developing a global standard for inclusive youth engagement, recognizing the need for a coordinated and comprehensive approach to empower and involve young people in shaping a better future.
  • The co-facilitators introduced the 20-page Zero Draft of the Pact for the Future at a meeting on January 29, 2024 in the Trusteeship Council. This was followed by initial comments from Member States. To know more about this consultation, refer to the ICH bulletin at the link.
  • The General Assembly committed in Decision 77/568 to adopting a Declaration on Future Generations, which, if approved, would be one of the outcomes of the Summit of the Future, scheduled for September 22–23, 2024, in New York, and annexed to the Pact for the Future. The co-facilitators of the Declaration on Future Generations, H.E. Mr. Brian Christopher Manley Wallace of Jamaica and H.E. Ms. Yoka Brandt of The Netherlands held virtual informal consultations with stakeholders on January 15 and 16, 2024, in advance of the intergovernmental negotiations scheduled for the second quarter of 2024. Separate consultations were held with Youth and Indigenous Groups; United Nations Agencies, Funds, and Programs; Civil society organizations, Research institutions, Academia; and the Private sector.
  • The Co-facilitators held a hybrid meeting with Major Group and other Stakeholders (MGoS) and Civil Society representatives to allow them to express their expectations on the Summit of the Future and contribute to the zero draft of the Pact for the Future. They called for an inclusive and transparent engagement, and a Pact that sets a high vision for multilateralism, equity and solidarity especially in the wake of global challenges and emerging issues.
  • Closed member state consultations on Chapter 4: Youth and future generations was held on 11th of December 2023. The consultations had a focus on the youth dimension, leaving discussions on future generations for the process of elaborating the Declaration on Future Generations. The key issues raised were the need to see youth as “agents of change in decision-making processes, strong support for the mandate of the UN Youth Office, and the importance of poverty eradication, quality education, decent work and employment, and skills training. Catch the latest on the Chapter 4 negotiations in the following ICH bulletin.
  • Closed member state consultations on Chapter 3: Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) and Digital Cooperation was held in the morning of 11th of December 2023 in Conference Room 2 in the UN General Assembly. Member states stressed on closely linking STI to the 2030 Agenda and the need to expand digital connectivity, so as to leave no one offline. The areas where member states lacked consensus were technology transfer and intellectual property rights, among others. Get more on the latest negotiations on Chapter 3 in the following ICH bulletin.
  • Closed member state consultations on Chapter 5: Transforming Global Governance was held on 6th of December 2023 in the Trusteeship Council. The key issues raised were reform of the Security Council, strengthening the role of the Peacebuilding Commission and the International Financial Architecture, including reform of Multilateral Development Banks and tax cooperation at the global level. Catch the latest on Chapter 5 negotiations in the following ICH bulletin.
  • Closed member state consultations on Chapter 2: International Peace and Security was held on 5th of December 2023. The key issues raised were respect for the UN Charter and international law, the prevention of conflicts, peaceful settlement of disputes, importance of the Women and Youth Peace and Security agendas, as well as, strengthening of the Peacebuilding Commission, reform of the Security Council, climate security, and emerging security risks. Catch the latest on the Chapter 2 negotiations in the following ICH bulletin.
  • Closed member state consultations on the Chapeau and Chapter 1: Sustainable Development and Financing for Development was held on the 1st of December 2023 in the ECOSOC Chamber. The co-facilitators, Germany and Namibia, proposed to use revision 3 of the draft decision as the starting point for negotiations, which was welcomed by many with the exception of G77 and China. The need for reform of the International Financial Architecture and debt restructuring featured prominently in these consultations. Get yourself updated on the latest news on Chapter 1 negotiations with the following ICH bulletin.
  • Information integrity is increasingly under threat of mis- and disinformation and hate speech, which inflict a range of harms. These include: worsening tensions in conflict areas, undermining the climate emergency and worsening the economic and social exclusion of vulnerable groups. In response, Member States have adopted legislation to promote information integrity while protecting users’ freedom of expression on digital platforms. However, several challenges remain in terms of protecting data, empowering users and improving transparency (among other issues).
  • UN 2.0 encapsulates the Secretary-General’s vision of a modern UN system, rejuvenated by a forward-thinking culture, and empowered by cutting-edge skills fit for the twenty-first century. It signifies the transformation towards a more agile, diverse, responsive and impactful UN capable of accelerating systemic shifts that deliver for all. Get a glance of the highlights from the Secretary-General’s policy brief on the UN 2.0 in the ICH bulletin below.
  • The right to education and lifelong learning is important to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development since education, knowledge, and learning are essential to an individual’s dignity, progress, and development. Education has been the great equalizer, a driving force in nation-building, and the engine of social, cultural, economic, and technical growth for ages. Today, however, education as we know it is no longer fit for purpose, afflicted by twin crises of equity and relevance. Building on the Transforming Education Summit and the International Commission on the Futures of Education report, this policy brief examines the current education crisis in greater depth and proposes a vision and set of guiding actions for countries and the international community to transform education.
  • In the declaration commemorating the United Nations’ 75th anniversary, heads of state and government committed to promoting peace and averting wars. It will take significant changes on the part of Member States to uphold and strengthen the multilateral system as the only practical way to address a complex array of global threats and carry out the objectives of the UN Charter on a global scale to honor this commitment. Nevertheless, for many people around the world, peace is still a distant dream. 
  • This policy brief outlines the shortcomings of our reliance on Gross Domestic Product (GDP) as a primary measure of economic development. This is, broadly, due to its failure to account for certain dimensions of economic activity, environmental destruction and human well-being. The brief recognises, moreover, the SDGs, 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Human Development Index (among others) as initiatives to go “Beyond GDP”. 
  • The key recommendations of this brief call for: a renewed political commitment by Member States to accurately “value what counts”, the construction of a robust technical and scientific process to produce key indicators that go “Beyond GDP”, and a major capacity-building and resourcing initiative to enable Member States to effectively utilise the new framework. Overall, these recommendations promote the creation of a universal and comprehensive measurement of sustainable development to complement, rather than replace, GDP; to more strongly capture what matters to the people, the planet and the future. 
  • The Secretary-General’s policy brief on “Reforms to the International Financial Architecture” states that “The international financial architecture, crafted in 1945 after the Second World War, is undergoing a stress test of historic proportions – and it is failing the test … This failure poses a growing and systemic threat to the multilateral system itself, driving deepening divergence, geoeconomic fragmentation and geopolitical fractures across the world … The present policy brief sets out action-oriented recommendations for reforming the international financial and tax architecture …”. Update yourself on the highlights and key action items proposed by the Secretary-General in the ICH bulletin below.
  • The brief proposes the development of a Global Digital Compact that would set out the principles, objectives, and actions for advancing an open, free, secure, and human-centered digital future, one that is anchored in universal human rights and that enables the attainment of the Sustainable Development Goals. It outlines areas in which the need for multi-stakeholder digital cooperation is urgent and sets out how a Global Digital Compact can help to realize the commitment in the declaration on the commemoration of the seventy-fifth anniversary of the United Nations (General Assembly resolution 75/1) to “shaping a shared vision on digital cooperation” by providing an inclusive global framework.
  • The third thematic deep dive or informal consultation on the Global Digital Compact (GDC) was held on 24 April 2023 at the Trusteeship Council Chamber. “The deep dives aim to share knowledge and views, as well as allow for contributions on a wide range of digital issues”. The Permanent Representative (PR) of Rwanda – H.E. Mr. Claver Gatete and PR of Sweden – H.E. Ms. Anna Karin Eneström are Co-Facilitators of the intergovernmental process negotiating the GDC.
  • The fourth thematic deep dive on the GDC on Human Rights Online was held on 8 May 2023. At the beginning of the deep dive, United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Volker Türk and Najat Maalla, the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Violence against Children, set the stage for the deep dive. Member State (MS), Intergovernmental agencies, private sector, and civil society representatives made their interventions after the briefings.
  • The knowledge and resources needed to fulfill the goals of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development are available in the modern world. But without the support and participation of a wide range of players, revolutionary changes will simply not be achievable at the scale necessary. Particularly true for the 1.2 billion young people who are living today. Young people hold the key to developing novel ideas that can bring about the breakthroughs our planet so desperately needs. They also stand to suffer the most if societies grow more unstable and unequal and if the triple planetary catastrophe worsens unchecked, as they will be the planet’s future keepers.
  • The first thematic deep dive or informal consultations on the Global Digital Compact (GDC) was held on 27 March 2023 at the Trusteeship Council Chamber. The meeting started with a presentation from the Secretary-General (SG) of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) Ms. Doreen Bogdan-Martin followed by briefings from Mr. Gbenga Sesan, Executive Director of Paradigm Initiative, representing civil society, and Mr. Karim Lesina, Executive Vice- President of Millicom, representing industry. Member State (MS) interventions followed the presentations after which civil society representatives made their interventions.
  • The second thematic deep dive on the Global Digital Compact (GDC) was held on 13 April 2023 at the Trusteeship Council Chamber. The meeting started with briefings from Mr. Vint Cerf, Internet pioneer; Ms. Helani Galpaya, CEO at LIRNEasia; and Ms. Tripti Sinha, Chair of ICANN. Member State (MS) and civil society representatives made their interventions after the briefings.
  • The Emergency Platform, as proposed by the Secretary-General (SG) in his policy brief, will allow the SG to convene Member States (MS), the UN system, key country groupings, International Financial Institutions, regional bodies, civil society, the private sector, subject-specific industries or research bodies, and other experts, in the event of crises of sufficient scale and magnitude, regardless of the type or nature of the crisis involved. Informal consultations on the proposed Emergency Platform happened on 16 March 2023, where MS requested additional information and differing views on the activation criteria and relationship with the General Assembly, among others, were expressed. Stakeholder consultations were organized on the same day with presentations from the Executive Office of the SG. Catch all that happened related to the Emergency Platform in the ICH bulletin here.
  • On 13 February 2023, the Secretary-General (SG) briefed Member States (MS) about “Our Common Agenda” report and his 11 upcoming policy briefs that aim to inform the preparations/negotiations for the Summit of the Future (SOTF) in 2024. On the following day, the co-facilitators of the SOTF – Germany and Namibia, convened informal consultations with MS, where the roadmap for 2023 was presented and the potential tracks, processes and priorities were discussed. On the third day, Germany and Namibia, organized stakeholder consultations, where civil society got the opportunity to voice their expectations on multilateral reform, SDGs and the SOTF preparatory processes, among others. Get all the updates and key information from these meetings in the ICH bulletin here.